• Craftsman style home in Oshara Village, Santa Fe Craftsman style home in Oshara Village, Santa Fe
  • Winner of Excellence in Green award in parade of homes Winner of Excellence in Green award in parade of homes
  • Living area with wood floors and ceilings and gas fired fireplace Living area with wood floors and ceilings and gas fired fireplace
  • Dining area with craftsman detailing on columns and trim Dining area with craftsman detailing on columns and trim
  • Entry foyer with east light in windows Entry foyer with east light in windows
  • Gas fired range and granite countertops Gas fired range and granite countertops
  • Breakfast bar with full wood cabinets Breakfast bar with full wood cabinets
  • North portal with garden area North portal with garden area
  • Front entry portal with cast concrete sill and craftsman style columns Front entry portal with cast concrete sill and craftsman style columns
  • South living room windows and master bedroom portal in courtyard South living room windows and master bedroom portal in courtyard
  • Bathroom with low flow fixtures Bathroom with low flow fixtures
  • Soaking tub in bathroom with hot water circulation triggered by motion detector Soaking tub in bathroom with hot water circulation triggered by motion detector

Craftsmen Style, Energy Efficient New Home

This Santa Fe home brings alive the design of the craftsman style home of the South Capital Historic District from the early part of last century and couples it with the aspects of a gold standard green home. It was the second home in the state of NM to participate in the Build Green New Mexico program and garner sustainable building tax credits for the owner. It scored a gold level or higher in all six green building categories. Incorporating passive solar design with well insulated floors, walls and ceilings, this home is heated with an high efficiency gas boiler and radiant floors. Hydronic solar panels on the roof preheat the hot water storage tank and contribute to both heating of the space and heating the domestic hot water.

Patios for outdoor living open onto three sides of the house, providing options of sun or shade throughout the seasons. The home is located in a new urban neighborhood designed for easy access to schools, businesses and walking and biking trails.

On the exterior, the trim is comprised of non-wood products which require no paint or maintenance. The insulated windows are wood on the inside and clad on the outside for UV protection and eliminating exterior maintenance on them as well.

Wood floors and ceilings grace the living area which centers around a gas burning fireplace. The kitchen has high-end appliances and granite countertops. The bathrooms and kitchen all have low flow, water efficient fixtures. Hot water is circulated to all of the fixtures as directed by motion detectors in each area.

 

Related Projects towards Energy & Resource Self Sufficiency

first-southwest-passive-house-in-us
Southwest’s First “Passive House”
Featured in Su Casa Magazine - Spring 2012
Daniel Buck Construction was pleased to build the Southwest’s first certified “Passive House”. It is in the City of Santa Fe, New Mexico’s historic rail yard district. At the time of construction there were only 15 or so Passive Houses in the U.S. This “German Passivhaus” construction technique combined with proper solar orientation uses 90 percent less energy than houses constructed with standard building methods. The project received the highest sustainability rating by the National Home Builders Association, “Emerald” - joining just four others in the state.
first-energy-star-home-in-new-mexico
New Mexico’s First “Energy Star Home”
Albuquerque Journal – March 22, 1999
In 1999 the Environmental Protection Agency - EPA certified this new home with a four star rating because it was 65% above the EPA’s national model energy code. Located in Santa Fe the home cools itself in the summer and heats itself during the winter months due to the trade winds and passive solar orientation. Water Harvesting catchments were planned into the landscaping and healthy building practices specified non-toxic paints, and wood treatments to reduce toxins.

Comments are closed.